Foundation / Special Projects / Sandra and Leon Levine Pediatric Inpatient Rehabilitation Center

Sandra and Leon Levine Pediatric Inpatient Rehabilitation Center

South Carolina’s first pediatric inpatient rehabilitation program

Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands is soon to be the home of South Carolina’s first pediatric inpatient rehabilitation program, thanks to the unwavering support of the community and beyond.

The Leon Levine Foundation (TLLF), located in Charlotte, N.C., made a $350,000 award to name the Sandra and Leon Levine Pediatric Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands. TLLF seeks to improve the human condition by creating permanent, measurable and life-changing impact. The gift to support the Rehabilitation Center expands the foundation’s philanthropic footprint to South Carolina and honors the legacy of Leon Levine, founder, and his wife, Sandra.

Learn more about the 
Sandra and Leon Levine Pediatric Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands here.

Prisma Health Children's Hospital

Each year, there are more than 150,000 children’s visits to Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands. Some children experience a life-altering condition or injury and require specialized rehabilitation. Because an inpatient pediatric rehabilitation program does not currently exist in South Carolina, patients and families are faced with challenges when they have to go out-of-state for care. The Sandra and Leon Levine Pediatric Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital will bridge this gap.

You can learn more about the Sandra and Leon Levine Pediatric Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands in the fall 2018 issue of Portfolio magazine.

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Orangeburg child’s miraculous progress highlights importance of having high-quality care close to home

On Friday, May 20, 2011, Wendy Johnson and her husband, Chris, a worship pastor, had just moved into a new home in Orangeburg. They had celebrated the finalization of their daughter, Naomi’s adoption earlier that week. The new home’s backyard pool was in disrepair and the Johnsons looked forward to fixing the pool and swimming together.

Naomi Johnson familyWendy Johnson had just checked on Naomi, who was playing outside with Wendy’s two grandsons when the boys ran inside. The oldest shouted, “Baby’s in the pool!”

Although the pool was surrounded by two fences, the boys had managed to open one of the gates. Wendy saw that Naomi was floating face down in about two feet of rainwater that had collected in the pool. The Johnsons’ then 14-year-old daughter, Rachel, grabbed Naomi out of the water and she and Wendy began cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and called 911.

The ambulance arrived quickly and paramedics administered CPR and transported her to the nearest hospital. “We were frantic. I begged them to call Richland. Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands sent the helicopter and a children’s ambulance,” said Wendy. Pediatric intensivist Robert Hubbird, MD, directed care by phone from Prisma Health Children’s Hospital–Midlands and gave orders to keep Naomi as cool as possible.

Naomi remained in the induced coma for 11 days. 

Read more about Naomi's experience at the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Prisma Health Children's Hospital–Midlands »

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Inpatient Rehabilitation Program at Children's Hospital

Each year, 40–50 patients at Prisma Health Children’s Hospital experience a condition or injury that requires specialized rehabilitation. Help them stay at home for care.